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Posts tagged ‘Meat’

Myth busting – Part 8

Myth: We must eat vegetables to be healthy, but we can live without meat.

 

Truth: Actually, it’s the opposite. We can live on animal foods alone, but it’s very hard to live on plant foods alone.

This myth-busting series is in danger of becoming a manifesto for meat eaters, and that is not my intention!! I feel the need to state – I love vegetables!!! I still recommend the MND target for vegetables and fruit intake is 17-a-day! And I am not trying to put a downer on the vegetarian choice!

But the truth is this, while half the human race are intolerant or sensitive to gluten in one way or another, I’ve never met a single person intolerant to chicken. I’ve never heard of anyone with a salmon intolerance. I’ve never heard of anyone allergic to mackerel.

Some people are intolerant to eggs, and many people are intolerant to dairy (food Mother Nature evolved for baby cows, not for adult humans) but very few healthy people have any kind of intolerance to meat, poultry or fish.

Following on from Myth busting – Part 7

You see, once we get through the claws, teeth and fur, that animal is all done with the whole ‘defending itself’ thing and Read more

Myth busting – Part 6

Continued from Myth busting – Part 5

Myth: OK, so gorillas might not be a great example, but cows are vegans, they eat only grass all day long, and look how big and strong they get! Clearly, a low-fat, meat-free, plant based diet is the way forward!

Truth: Cows eat an extremely high-fat diet! And they are not vegans!

Yeah this one will really mess with your head! Yes, cows eat an 80% fat diet, through a very similar set up as described in Myth busting – Part 5 for the gorilla. Cows and gorillas are both fermenters, so in some ways cows and gorillas have more in common, from a digestive perspective, than humans and gorillas.

Cows are ruminants, they have multiple digestive chambers inside (you’ve heard ‘cows have four stomachs’ right?) the first of which is called a rumen. When they eat grass and leafy plants, it all goes straight down into the rumen, where the process of ‘rumination’ (hence the genus name, ruminant) begins. Rumination involves bringing the food up and down between the mouth and the rumen, generally four to five times for every mouthful.

A cow’s rumen is an amazing thing. This fact blows my mind: in a single cow’s rumen, there are more bacteria then there are human being’s alive on the whole planet! Boom! Mind blown!

And on top of all that bacteria, there are billions of protozoa and digestive enzymes too, and this is still only in the first of the cow’s four major digestive chambers. Traditional tribes used to understand that the lining of a cow’s rumen is so nutritionally dense, they would kill a cow and eat the rumen lining, throwing the muscle meat to their dogs. Yes, they ate the organs and stomach lining and gave the sirloin steak and fillet steak to their dogs!

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Myth busting – Part 5

This post is Part 5 of a continuing series of posts tackling persistent myths in the world of healthy eating, with a particular focus on the consumption of animal foods as a source of ill health and environmental destruction.

You may like to read the whole series starting from Myth busting – Part 1

Myth: But big strong animals like gorillas don’t eat meat. A gorilla is a vegan and he’s made of muscle! So who needs all that protein now then?!?!

You may have seen this image circulating on social media sites, lots of folks who don’t really know much about health and nutrition like to share this image as some kind of ‘proof’ that it is healthiest to be a vegan, and no one needs to eat animal foods at all.

I don’t want to sound rude, and this next line isn’t meant to be an attack on any vegans or an insult to anyone specifically, but in all honesty, sharing this Internet meme as some kind of ‘proof’ that people shouldn’t eat meat is pretty much the highest display of ignorance out there in the whole ‘meat vs. vegetarian’ discussion.

Not ignorant because the people sharing it don’t know much about the digestive system of a gorilla; that’s fair enough, most folks probably don’t; but ignorant because the people sharing this are stupid enough to think the digestive function of one animal somehow acts as some guide of evidence-based scientific guide to the digestive system of another. That is just plain dumb.

Why would the digestive system and food habits of a gorilla have anything to do with a human?

Oh because gorillas have muscles, therefore this is ‘proof’ of how to build muscles?

Well elephants have muscles too; maybe I should eat an elephant’s diet? Read more

Myth busting – Part 1

This is the first instalment in a series of posts tackling persistent myths in the world of healthy eating, with a particular focus on the consumption of animal foods as a source of ill health and environmental destruction.shutterstock_159768692

It’s simply not true that eating animal foods causes ill health and environmental damage. However, intensive industrialised agriculture certainly causes environmental damage and leads to humans eating animal products that are less-than-optimal nutritionally.

The vast, overwhelming majority of research linking meat consumption to ill health fails to separate meat products from animals that have been raised in intensive, industrialised agricultural systems from meat products that come from animals raised humanely, naturally and sustainably.

I have written about this before, if this interests you please check the following posts:

https://mothernaturesdiet.me/2015/10/26/meat-consumption-and-cancer-who-report-and-media-frenzy/

https://mothernaturesdiet.me/2013/02/17/naturally-reared-meat-versus-junk-meat/

https://mothernaturesdiet.me/2013/03/07/new-research-linking-processed-meat-to-increased-risk-of-death/

This series of posts will now primarily look at the issue of whether or not it is healthier to be a vegetarian or a meat eater, and connections between modern agriculture and its impact on the environment.

Let’s start with…

Myth: Eating fat makes you fat

Truth: Eating more calories than you use makes you fat, whether those calories come from dietary fats, carbohydrates or anything else. Eating a broad, healthy, whole foods diet high in wholesome natural dietary fats does not make you fat. Eating a lot of processed foods and sugar will significantly contribute to making you store more body fat.

I’m starting with this one because this should be pretty easy for you MND’ers to grasp, this is old news to you now. Over the last 60 years, the diet industry has promoted low-fat as the way to go to lose weight and prevent heart disease. Sadly, after 60 years of this, we have an obesity epidemic spreading across the entire Western world, heart disease rates are higher than ever, and we’ve thrown in an international diabetes epidemic as an unexpected little bonus. I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty sure stripping the fat out of everything and replacing it with added refined sugar and processed vegetable oils wasn’t the smartest way forward.

As I have already hammered this topic to death about a hundred times, I won’t go over it in too much detail again now, let’s just highlight the three key points:

  • A certain amount of body fat is good. Excess body fat can become unhealthy. Lots of your body is made up of fat – your brain is largely fat and water. Your nervous system is made up of lots of fat (and cholesterol). Many hormones are made up from lipids (fats) in your body, helping to regulate mood, sleep, sexual function and more. Fat keeps you warm and fat is a great place to store certain vitamins, minerals and hormones, that all help to keep you healthy. So don’t just hate fat!
  • Mother Nature designed dietary fat as a dense source of calories – calories are energy you can use, so eating dietary fat is a great way to consume lots of usable calories for energy (more on high fat diets below). Dietary fats include lots of lipids that help nourish and support these important functions in your body – hormone production, mood regulation, brain and nervous system function, heart function, joint function and more. Natural dietary fat is not bad. Natural fats – from olive oil to organ meats, from avocado to oily fish – can be part of a healthy human diet for everyone. Over-eating fat, like over-eating anything, can become a problem.
  • Animal fats are an [in my opinion] essential element of a well-balanced healthy human diet. We rose to prominence on this planet, between 7 million years ago and the beginning of the agricultural period around 10,000 years ago, by hunting and eating other animals. Saturated fat has always been a major component of the human diet. Over the last 60 years, as food companies pulled all the fat out of processed food, they realised that it left that food bland and tasteless, so they added processed refined sugar, refined vegetable oils and processed salt to create flavour – the end results of half-a-century of this are not good!

 

A steak and a beer…

All this stuff in the press about red meat being a probable carcinogen…

So under some rather questionable research methodologies, they have classified ‘consumption of red meat’ as ‘probably carcinogenic’ – Class 2A

But alcoholic beverages are a KNOWN Class 1 ‘carcinogenic to humans’.

IARC red meat Class 2A carcinogenIARC alcohol Class 1 carcinogen

All these folks claiming “that’s it now folks, time to quit meat” – I don’t see them all running around declaring “beer gives you cancer!”

‪#‎hypocrites‬
‪‬

Get the facts: https://mothernaturesdiet.me/2015/10/26/meat-consumption-and-cancer-who-report-and-media-frenzy/

IARC classifications

Meat Consumption and Cancer (WHO report and media frenzy)

This week, the media here in the UK (and elsewhere I guess) is awash with this latest ‘processed meat and cancer’ story. WHO cancer agency IARC (The International Agency for Research on Cancer) just published a report (October 2015) identifying associations between meat consumption and cancer. The media has, predictably, gone nuts over this story.

In my opinion, this is not news at all. This supports everything I say and every word MotherNaturesDiet stands for.

‘Processed’ is the key word here

The report mostly points a finger at processed meat, then less so at red meat in general.

Living the MotherNaturesDiet way, we say ‘avoid processed foods’. That’s Core Principle 3. If it has a barcode and a list of ingredients, don’t eat it. That stands here, for processed meat, too.

Just to be clear, this new report won’t be forcing me to make any changes to the MotherNaturesDiet recommended healthy lifestyle. I’ve been warning against processed meat for a long time.

https://mothernaturesdiet.me/2013/03/07/new-research-linking-processed-meat-to-increased-risk-of-death/

In my opinion, any dietary advice generally around ‘red meat’ MUST be openly questioned.

As I often explain in my live seminars, before you eat an animal (or plant) you have to ask “What did that animal eat?”

If the animal was mistreated and eating grains, and worse (antibiotics, growth hormones, ash, cardboard, mashed up pig parts…etc.) then that animal will make meat that is not so good for you. But if the animal has lived a natural life, living outside (pasture raised, free range) eating grass (natural food for cows) and been treated properly, then the meat will be nutritious and good for you.

This is, of course, the logic behind Core Principle 8 – eat only organic, free range, pasture-raised, grass-fed meat.

So this WHO advisory makes ZERO different at all to MND.

For a long time, I have been asking the question: Read more

Packing in my green veggies!!!

Almost every day, I am asked how I manage to get an average of 17 portions of vegetables and fruit per day into my all-natural, nutrient-dense diet. I eat between 10 and 20 servings of veg EVERY day, averaging out in a typical week to 14 or 15 vegetables per day, plus 2 or 3 pieces of fruit per day.

Look at these meals –

Breakfast: IMG_6097

– eggs and greens, loaded with broccoli, rainbow chard, kale, dandelion greens and spinach. Read more

MND home cooked food on a budget

What is this post about?

– Eating the MND way on a budget

– Cooking ‘real food’ when away from home with restricted resources

– Managing with only the most basic cooking facilities

– Travelling and still eating healthily – and affordably

– Eating to fuel lots of exercise

MND on holiday!!

‘Team MND’ recently took a holiday – a week hiking in the French Alps. We rented a small and very basic apartment and went hiking every day,  which was great fun. I’ve not got time to write an extensive trip review, and I don’t suppose you want to read it anyway! So I’ll stick to the relevant and interesting stuff.

We hiked for 5 days, covering between 11 and 17 miles per day, and climbing an average of 4500 to 7000 feet per day. On average, we spent about 10 hours out on the hills each day, and our average daily mileage was 14 miles, and 6000 feet of ascent, 6000 feet of descent. Read more

Back off those carbs!

One of the things I am most often asked about eating the MND way is why I suggest not eating starchy carbohydrates, particularly grains. I just want to cover that briefly today.

Summary:

  • Why we should avoid eating grains, processed carbs and starchy carbs in general
  • New research indicates that maintaining a fairly high-protein diet reduces signs of frailty in old age
  • Basically, those eating a diet higher in protein, maintained ‘strength’ longer, and those eating a diet lower in protein, reported more signs of frailty in older age
  • It doesn’t seem to matter if that protein comes from veggies or meat or fish, just so long as you are eating one or all of those things
  • Eat the MND way for a nutrient-packed diet with no need for nutrient-poor starchy carbs
  • Just eat plants and animals

MotherNaturesDiet (MND) is a fairly-low-carb diet. MND includes masses of vegetables, many of which provide carbs, so I do not promote MND as “low-carb” strictly, more I promote MND as “no-processed-carbs”. See MND Core Principle 1 – no processed grains, and MND Core Principle 2 – no refined sugar.

Why should we avoid carbs? Why no grains?

Living the MND way involves avoiding all those starchy carbs that other people eat – bread, cereals, pasta, white potatoes, rice, spaghetti, pastries, cakes and so on.

There are many reasons for this.

All grains are members of the ‘cereal crops’ family of plants. These are all a type of grass. Grasses are cellulose plants that humans cannot eat, and these foods are not digestible without processing.

I think Mother Nature designed animals to eat the grasses, then we eat the animals.

Ruminants (cows, sheep, goats, etc.) have a stomach (the rumen, hence their genus name) designed to act as a fermentation tank. Once fermented, they can then extract nutrients from these foods. Humans do not have a rumen and cannot digest grains, hence grains have to be processed in order for us to digest them.

Personally, I think it’s healthier and more natural to let the cow do the fermenting, and then I eat the cow.

The food chain

In Mother Nature’s grand design, it’s a form of ‘upregulation of energy’ – the sun falls on the huge flat surface of the earth, helping the grasses to grow, they absorb the suns vital energy. Cows eat the grass and upregulate the output of the sun’s energy into muscle, or beef, as we like to call it. We eat the cow. We die and our blood and bones and flesh put carbon, phosphorous, potassium, nitrogen and many other minerals back into the soil, to help feed the insects and bugs and help grow more plants, and so the whole cycle repeats.  Read more

Eating the most nutritious meat…but on the smallest budget

This is a fantastic lunch recipe, super nutritious and very tasty. Please see pictured lambs kidneys and lots of green veggies – yum yum! This meal contains 250 grams of lambs kidneys, lots of green veggies – organic broccoli, cabbage, green pepper, tomatoes, mushrooms and spinach, and an assortment of spices – coriander, cumin, paprika, black pepper and chilli flakes.

 

Lean white skinless boneless chicken breasts

For most of the last 40 or 50 years we’ve been told that fat is bad, especially saturated fat from animal sources, and we should all eat a lean low-fat diet. This has resulted (at least here in the UK) in an obsession with skinless lean filleted chicken breast. People have been educated to ‘obsession point’ that fat is bad and even the skin or the ‘brown’ thigh meat is considered too high in fat. This has led to a scenario you are probably familiar with, stories of ‘abused broiler chickens’ – chickens bred for the size of their breasts. I am sure you have heard about the speed of their growth, how they live in cramped smelly barns and their bodies grow so fast their legs can buckle beneath them.

While European countries generally maintain better standards of animal husbandry than in the US, these issues are still a huge concern. They certainly bother me. Read more

What’s gone wrong with our food?

What’s gone wrong with our food? Why are we so obsessed with nutrients?

For tens of thousands of years we humans were quite happy and quite healthy (and of mostly fairly normal body weight) just eating real whole foods, namely plants and animals.

Then ‘they’ came along and started poking around with microscopes and test tubes and Bunsen burners, and suddenly everything was broken down into science, and eventually they vilified animal fats. So everyone cut out animal fats, and fat was labelled bad, but the finger pointed specifically at saturated fat from animal sources. So people ate less red meat, and they cut out butter and in response the food companies made margarine, and started adding lots of extra sugar (because with no fat, the food tasted bland) and these odd ‘engineered chemical fats and oils’ to various foods. Then after a decade or two eating those, as people got fatter and diabetes and heart disease rates soared, then they changed stance, and now trans fats and cheap vegetable oils are vilified as the baddies, so we should all go back to butter and ditch the margarine.

And the people asked “But we stopped eating animal saturated fats, years ago, because they were bad…right?”

The people wanted to know “what is it that is supposed to be so wrong with animal foods? How come all that research linked high rates of disease to the consumption of animal foods?” Read more

Beware of health and wellness industry rip offs

This post is about supplements, in particular, so-called superfood supplements, and how they are being sold to health-conscious consumers at extortionate prices. This post looks at the prices of these supplements, pound-for-pound compared to the price of real, natural, whole foods.

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Humans – a gluttonous cancer on this planet, or beautiful loving souls?

I have been watching videos and reading this evening.
I watched this, and I think you should too: Holy Sh-t! Without Saying a Word This 6 Minute Short Film Will Make You Speechless

Watching this video, several quite obvious thoughts came to me.

If you can’t handle this video, think about your consumption of meat.

If you eat meat, I urge you to follow the guidelines laid out here in MotherNaturesDiet Core Principle 8, only eat meat, fish and eggs from organic, free range, sustainably farmed, well treated animals.

How humans treat animals is disgraceful. I think we have forgotten that WE are animals too. We seem to think that putting on clothes and building houses makes us different. We are still made of bone, muscle, blood and flesh. We feel pain, hot, cold, love, sadness. We are animals too.

Humans seem like disgusting, ugly, gluttonous creatures, self-obsessed, greedy, short-termist. We crawl all over this planet like vermin, fouling it, consuming it. Aliens observing from afar must think we are a disease, like a cancer, eating Mother Earth alive.

I spent some time thinking about how easy it is for a movie maker or editor to produce a film, cut to portray a view which he or she wishes to portray.

I spent some time thinking about how humans can be amazing creatures.

I watched this (I have seen so many times before) about Narayanan Krishnan: CNN Hero Narayanan Krishnan

And I watched this too: How To Restore Your Faith In Humanity

And finally, I decided, as if so often the case…it all comes down to YOU. Each and every one of us has to take personal responsibility, to look after ourselves, to spread love, not to hate, to respect Mother Nature and the other animals we share this planet with, to respect the trees and plants and soil an air and water, and not pollute our own home. If we all decided to be good people, responsible citizens of Earth, kind and loving humans, then many of the worlds problems would be well on their way to being solved.

The BBC seemingly ‘recommending’ a Big Mac over a home cooked Sunday roast

Many of you may have seen an article the BBC News site ran regarding new research linking red meat consumption to heart disease.

This is the original article: Red meat chemical 'damages heart', say US scientists

A good friend of mine who runs a vegan health retreat asked me for my thoughts, and I ended up writing a long reply to him, so I thought I would share it here with you too.

Here are my thoughts.

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Is Free Range Meat Expensive?

I am often asked about the cost of free-range, outdoor-reared, organic meat. Many people question if it costs too much to eat the MND way.

I admit that some organic food is expensive, and some free range meat is expensive, but honestly, personally, I think the investment in my health is worth it. I buy food that nourishes my body, I know the animals have been treated properly, with some dignity and respect, and I know the life of that animal, and hence the food I am eating, has been lived more in tune with nature.

The picture shows a lunch I cooked last week. Pork and greens, quick, simple, yummy. I put a drizzle of olive oil in the pan, chopped up a leek first and threw that in, then I chopped up my pork tenderloin, threw that in, then a handful of kale chopped up (I keep telling you I eat either kale or broccoli every day of my life, often both, often multiple times! I had kale in all my meals the day I made this!)

Quick and cheap, for my main meal of the day

This took less than 5 mins to prepare, and max 5 mins to cook.

My pork tenderloin weighed 395 grams raw (about a pound) it cost just £3.65

So this lunch cost about £4 quid in total, and it was tasty, natural and nutritious. I sprinkled on some black pepper and a sprig of parsley, easy, quick, tasty. No additives. No chemicals...there was even some free mud on my kale. Perfect, I didn't even wash it off.

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Sick of Eating Meat!!!

This ‘headline’ will get the attention of my vegetarian friends!!

I trained hard early this morning, then came home and needed a good breakfast to feed my body after training, and to nourish me for the day, as I went out rock climbing all day and I knew I probably wouldn’t get the chance to eat much during the day.

As you know, if you have been reading this blog, I eat a lot of meat. Animal products make up about 50% of my diet (measured by calories) and fruit and veggies make up the other half. I like meat and when I started on my ‘paleo’ journey it seemed like a treat to have so much tasty meat in my diet...succulent roasts for lunch, juicy sausages and eggs for breakfast, tasty chicken any time, any day, any meal. But I have to say, since I massively ramped up my meat intake about 10 months ago, that novelty has now worn off, and while I still enjoy the majority of my meals, there are days I feel like I can’t handle any more meat!!

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Train hard, eat well, sleep

I trained hard today, in my home gym, lots of body-weight moves, but using my OLD body weight. I have a weight vest which puts 5 stones (70 pounds, 32 kilos) extra on my frame. I like to exercise wearing this vest, as it reminds me that I lost all that fat, and more, over the years.

No wonder I found 20 push-ups hard work back then. 20 push-ups now wearing that vest is hard work! Without the vest, I can bang out sets of 50 no problem, but the vest really makes a big difference, just 20 is hard work.

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Horse meat in our food supply – why you only have yourself to blame, Joe Public

I have been avoiding writing about this horse meat scandal in the UK, but I can’t keep quiet about it any longer.

I am not the only nor the first to voice the broad opinion that ‘you the people wanted cheap food, you wanted to be able to buy a microwave dinner for 99p, you wanted a whole box of frozen burgers for just £1.99, what the hell did you think you were getting? Did you relay expect high food safety and quality standards when you were demanding such ridiculously cheap goods?’ I want to say ‘Shut up and quit complaining, you get what you pay for in life.’ But that doesn’t say enough, to state it like that sounds aggressive and ignorant, when perhaps ignorance is the problem in the first place, so this needs a little more explanation.

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KISS – Keep It Simple, Stupid!

You know, everyone wants to try to over-complicate this whole health and weight loss thing, but in my opinion, that just isn't necessary.

I often feel sorry for ordinary folks trying hard to lose weight and be healthy, but stuck in the quagmire of books, diet programs, conflicting advice, confusing messages, and so on. Of course, all these celebrities, doctors, publishers, companies (who make supplements) all offer their big complex 'solutions' because they are trying to make money - diet books sell, supplements sell, pills that promise to increase the rate at which you burn fat, sell.

The truth is, in my opinion, that 99% of all that stuff is just not necessary.

Caveman didn't need a 'diet system' to be healthy

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What to eat for Lunch

Any of you regular readers will have seen numerous posts before detailing some of the meals I make myself for lunch.

I acknowledge that as a self-employed home-based worker, I have the flexibility to make lunch my main meal of the day, which is something many of you would struggle with, if you are based in an office, shop, factory or warehouse. I appreciate that flexibility. But still, you can copy some of my lunch ideas, cook them at the weekends and take them in to work, eat them cold, microwave reheat them, or just use them for your dinner ideas.

For me, lunch is my main meal of the day. Because I am home based, I tend to work out in the middle of the day (not every day, I also train first thing in the morning some days) and then I have a large late lunch, my post-training meal and biggest meal of the day. But your routine might be different. Maybe you go to the gym after work, then have your main meal as your evening meal, so just take these lunch ideas and make them your dinner ideas. Not really rocket science, is it?

Post-workout protein

Lunch needs to contain a big hit of protein for me.

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