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Part 6 – The DNAfit genetic test

Part 6 in the genetics mini-series, the final part.

if you have read the first 5 parts and found it all interesting, I strongly recommend getting your own DNA test and finding out more about yourself. I have.

Our friend Dawn is currently (March only) offering a special discount deal, 30% off a comprehensive test, full details of all that the test covers are in this post.

That’s a good deal – so, go on, jump in, go for it!

New Dawn Health

Over the last few posts, we have learned how genetic variations between us make us the individuals we are, both on the inside and on the outside. We know that food speaks to our genes and in turn, our genes can affect how our foods are processed. We understand that knowing our genetic differences can help us to exercise more efficiently and maintain a healthy weight. And we know that we can help our genes stay healthy as we age.

We now appreciate that we have more influence and control over our protein-encoding genes than we realised. Thankfully, we can positively influence our genetic health trajectory. The more ‘inside knowledge’ of your personal genetic make-up you have, the better you can tweak your diet, lifestyle and training, to optimise your health.

During March 2019, I am offering the complete ‘DNAFit Diet Fitness Pro 360’ package at a 35% discounted rate…

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Part 5 – Optimising healthy ageing

Part 5 on genes and how your diet and lifestyle can interact with your own personal DNA.

In this post, our friend Dawn explains some of the ways your diet and lifestyle can work with, or against, your natural genetic predispositions to influence ageing.

This is probably the most technical of the series so far, but it’s important stuff to know. One more post to come in a couple of days, to wrap the series up – keep an eye out for that later this week!

New Dawn Health

So how do we help our genes continue to work well as we age? How can we prevent DNA damage? Let’s take a look at three diet and lifestyle factors you can optimise to support healthy genetic ageing – micronutrients, inflammation and stress.

Micronutrients and DNA Health

Micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals play key roles in the making and repairing of DNA. Too much, or not enough, micronutrients can cause nicks and breaks in the DNA bonds. If the cell doesn’t have enough key micronutrients, then it can’t make the right proteins to repair itself. This can lead to mutations. There is a developing body of research which links DNA damage to infertility, cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodevelopmental disease, cognitive decline and risk of early death.

Key micronutrients for making, repairing, and keeping DNA working well are:

  • Polyphenols (natural beneficial chemicals in plants)
  • The antioxidant vitamins A & C
  • B2, B3, B6…

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Part 4 – Weight management genes

We’re back, with Part 4 of this great short series about genetics. This post explains a few great examples of gene-diet or gene-lifestyle interactions; these really help you see how knowing your personal genetic variations can really help you make smarter choices, to optimise your lifestyle to the one that is ideal for you.

Part 5 coming in a couple of days!

New Dawn Health

Genetic variations (SNPs) are one reason why we have different appetites; are satiated by different amounts of food and have different food preferences. Our genes also regulate how insulin works in our body; how many fat cells we make and how full they can get. Our genes determine how well we can breakdown those stored fats and use them for energy. Our individual genetic profile influences what we can and can’t digest, our tendency to gain weight, absorb important nutrients and cope with toxins.

Let’s take a deeper look into the world of nutrigenomics and weight management.

The first thing to say is that nutrigenomics is a tool in the ‘diet toolbox’ that can help you manage your weight. It’s not the whole answer, of course not, but there are some valuable insights. Let’s start with how best to balance your carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

Macronutrient Balance

You can’t have…

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Part 3 – My Story

Continuing the mini-series on genetics, my friend Dawn is back with Part 3 today, looking into her own results from DNA testing to see what she learned, how she can use that information, and how it can benefit her to achieve optimal good health.

Personally, I have had my genes tested too, and my own results (which I should write up for you) tell a similar story – foods I should eat, things to avoid; type of exercise that suits me, lifestyle changes to make.

Watch out for Part 4 in this series coming later this week!

New Dawn Health

Studying nutrigenomics, having my genes tested and having some blood tests done has given me two tangeable benefits. Firstly, I make food and exercise choices based on my genetic predispositions and nutrient levels.  And secondly, I relax about this being different to other people’s food and exercise choices. One-size-does-not-fit-all.

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Vitamin D

You may know that I lived in the Middle East for three years. During that time, I studied Nutritional Therapy. As part of that learning, I took a vitamin D test and was shocked to discover that my vitamin D level was only 19 nmol/L. A good level is 50-60 nmol/L. How could that be when I was exposed to so much sunshine? Well, I only found out when I returned to the UK and later took a DNA test. I have the genetic variation (SNP) that reduces the production of an enzyme in the liver & kidneys that…

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Part 2 – Nutrients and genes

Following on from a few days ago, Dawn is back with Part 2 of her 5-part mini-series on genetics and understanding our DNA.
This is a complex topic, and I think she has done a great job here of explaining it in good simple English.
Keep an eye out for Part 3 coming along next week.

New Dawn Health

There’s a buzz-phrase used when learning about genes and nutrition,

“Genes load the gun, but environment pulls the trigger”.

What this means is that we may be predisposed to health challenges because of our gene variations (SNPs), but it’s what we do to ourselves that actually triggers a problem, or not. This is an important to remember. If we want to, we can always positively influence our health outcomes.

Environmental factors like exercise, stress, sleep, diet and pollution affect how our genes function. Cigarette smoke damages cellular DNA and causes mutations. Exercise has a positive effect on our health by optimising insulin and glucose levels. Some of the latest research into high intensity interval training is finding that this type of exercise triggers a release of anti-inflammatory chemicals from protein-encoding genes.

So, what about diet and gene interactions? There are two sides to this.

  • Our genes affect how we respond…

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Part 1 – Introduction to genes

My friend Dawn over at http://www.NewDawnHealth.me is running a 5-part series on genetics, and I am going to re-blog them to share them with you.

You may recall back in January, Dawn produced a 10-part series on gut health, which I shared with you, and I thought that was great, so I am delighted she is back with more.

Genetics is a fascinating topic, and there is much to be learned in digging in to our own DNA and learning about our own personal unique tendencies and predispositions. I have had several DNA tests in recent years and they have all revealed interesting and useful information.

Let’s get started on Part 1, and keep an eye out for Part 2 in a few days’ time.

Thanks Dawn!

New Dawn Health

Up until recently, I thought that the genes I inherited from my parents told my body how to develop into the person I am. You know, brown eyes, 5′ 6’’, reasonable IQ! But I’ve never stopped to think that the way I have chosen to live my life, are actual instructions to my genes, telling them what to do, or what not to do. I never thought that I had some control over my gene function.

But our lifestyle and environment do play a significant role in shaping the way our genes work.  In this 5-part blog I want to explore how food and genes interact together and how can we design a lifestyle strategy to help us become more resilient to the effects of ageing.

You will have heard of the Human Genome Project, completed in 2003. It was the mapping of the entire code of 20,000 human genes…

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