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Posts tagged ‘Family’

What’s your reason why? And is it strong enough…

Why do you want to be healthy?
Why should you eat well, exercise, get an early night, drink more water, drink less booze, eat your veggies, cut down on the hedonistic lifestyle, manage your stress, join a yoga class, go running and lift a few weights?
Why would you do all that?
What’s your motivation?
What’s your reason why?

Maybe you want ‘the body beautiful’ – whatever that means to you.
Maybe you want to get your hands on someone else’s body beautiful!
Maybe you want to be bursting with energy.
Perhaps you are striving to resist the signs of ageing.
Maybe you have a family history of ill health and you are making every effort not to follow that line.
Perhaps you want to improve your performance in your chosen sport.
Maybe you want to avoid ill health, the decline of serious illness that comes later in life.

There are plenty of reasons to engage in a healthy lifestyle – do you know what yours is?

Thinking time…

That last question…

Do you know what yours is?

Did you have to think about it, or did the answer Read more

Doing what you have to do, versus doing what you want to do…

It’s all too easy to get wrapped up in all the tasks we have to do…and forget to give ourselves time to enjoy.

There is an art to finding balance in how we live our lives.

From a statement like that, we could go off in all manner of directions; around diet and ‘moderation in all things’; around exercise and the benefits of variety; around relationships, careers and more. Rather than exploring any or all such topics in depth, let’s just look at one angle, the work-life balance. And by ‘work’ I don’t just mean ‘career’ or ‘your job’, I mean the broader work-life balance, the balance between always doing what you have to do, versus doing what you want to do. In our modern high-speed lives we always have so much to do.

Some of this is real – that leak in the conservatory roof must get fixed, because every time it rains water is pouring in and it’s making a mess, filling buckets, staining the floor, so this is an urgent task that must be attended to, it’s no use saying “I’ll do that next month”. But many of the things we find ourselves striving to get done are not so essential, or at least not so urgent; often they are self-imposed rules we feel we should live by, or goals we feel we must achieve to fit in, to meet certain social or societal standards, to keep up with the Jones’s. We don’t want our lawn to look unkempt compared to our neighbours; we must attend that parent–teacher association meeting at our child’s school; we must wear certain clothes, look a certain way, earn a certain amount, drive a certain type of car.

Constant overwhelm

It’s not to say there is anything wrong with helping out at the parent–teacher association, or driving a BMW, or having an immaculately manicured lawn, there isn’t, these are all good things. But the problem is, we often find our lives become completely swamped in all these things, between parenting, working full time, trying to stay fit and healthy, keeping up family contacts and obligations, maintaining the home and more, so often we feel utterly overwhelmed with it all. I speak to people almost daily who joke (but they are only half-joking) something like “I go to work for a rest!” Often we find the weekend is busier than the working week.

I feel this myself sometimes…I pour my energy into my working week, it has structure and purpose, I have objectives for the week, and I work hard to get those things done. Working from home I have to be fairly strict about my working time; I have to avoid distractions, family, the kids, things that need fixing, conversations, play, repairs…all the things that come up during a typical week. I have to have the discipline to say “Not now, I’ll put it on my list and deal with it at the weekend” and by the time the weekend comes, I have more to do on a Saturday or Sunday that during the week – so much for rest!

No time for fun at the weekend

This has become our norm as a society. And I don’t know about you, but I am fairly hard on myself for the things that don’t get done. I still don’t find time to Read more

Mothering the Human Race

What is this post about?

If you want to know what MND is all about…this is it. This is fundamentally important.

We, all of us, used to be fed, nourished, by the mother figure in our household. Now we are all-too-often fed by Food Companies.

Our mothers care deeply for our good health. Food companies care about making a profit.

Food companies are not ‘educated’ in healthcare, nor motivated by the health and longevity of their customers.

This change in the structure of our society is at the root of much of what has gone wrong, in my opinion, this is a fundamental cause of the obesity epidemic and rising rates of poor health.

This topic has come up a few times over the last week or two, so I thought I should address it today.

The shift to microwave meals

I was writing about this the other day, there has been a massive cultural shift over the last 40 or 50 years, since the liberated times of the ’60s really, and the boom in consumer electronics in the ‘70s, we’ve seen the rise of convenience foods, the rise of sexual equality, the advent of the microwave and now the rise of the Internet…these trends have shifted women from the home to the work place (no sexism here, I’m not saying it’s right or wrong, just that it has happened) and we have left “feeding our families” to food companies.

We’ve seen a massive decline in home baking, in the art of real cooking, growing our own food, baking bread, preparing sauces, meats, roasts, pies and pastries…and we have seen a MASSIVE rise in pre-prepared meals, packaged foods, convenience foods. As we watch more celebrity chefs on TV, we seem less capable as a nation of preparing our own fresh, basic, healthy meals. We had the advent of microwave ovens, programmable cookers, it’s all led to less “motherly involvement” in cooking, and more “relying on food companies” to feed our families, our children.

The rise of the Internet, coincides with going from the 3 TV channels I grew up with, to the 600 available now, and the rise of “dial for a take away” and pizza delivered by moped. Now people are too busy online to cook. Every day people tell me they don’t have time to cook – they tell me this on Facebook, where they seem to spend several HOURS per day. They say they can’t afford organic food – but they CAN afford broadband and a smartphone. Read more